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Thread: Ending of QSO with TU ..

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AuthorText


Posted: 2022-01-09 14:31
I noticed that many HAMs end a QSO with TU followed by two dits. I understand TU as Thank You, but what is the relevance/history behind the two dits (e e) which follows?


Posted: 2022-01-09 23:59
A departure kiss on your left and right cheek


Posted: 2022-01-10 00:50
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/380615

73 means regards;http://www2.hawaii.edu/~rtoyama/73flash.html
TU means thank you;

di-dit means cheerio.

It may have originated from shave and a haircut two bits

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shave_and_a_Haircut
https://www.tarboard.net/tarboard/messages/43818.htm

https://muppet.fandom.com/wiki/Shave_and_a_Haircut

Good luck finding where that came from . . . .


Posted: 2022-01-11 00:08
As said, short version of "shave and a haircut two bits"....

But e e (with the little extra space between them), also sounds a bit like bye bye...



Posted: 2022-01-11 10:19

. . and hi hi is reputed to sound like laughter, tho I can't say it does to me . . .


Posted: 2022-01-12 00:17
cb:
. . and hi hi is reputed to sound like laughter, tho I can't say it does to me . . .


Originated in railway code, means ho ho. sounds like chrismas man laughter.



Posted: 2022-01-12 10:47

All those steam engine chimneys - santa probably needed a laugh . . .


Posted: 2022-01-13 20:42

Hi,

I found the following in:

ZEN AND THE ART OF RADIOTELEGRAPHY
Carlo Consoli, IK0YGJ
Rev. 20101008

[quote=Carlo Consoli]

This freedom of manipulating a telegraph key produces very interesting phenomena: the laughter, HI, for example, is not transmitted accurately H (four dots),
followed with the proper spacing by the I (two dots), it but is transmitted as four-dots, a light syncope, a dot, another syncope and a final dot. The resulting sound is
incredibly similar to that of a real laugh. Once heard, it cannot be forgot.
This phenomenon is a real articulation of language, vehicle of a specific meaning: the telegraphic message is articulated in different ways to communicate
different meanings for the same term.
The term HI means, in fact, also high, hence the need to send the two terms differently.
Another example of an articulation words is the way the procedural signal “end of the transmission” (SK) is often stretched beyond measure, and then followed by
two quick dots. The sound is very distinctive and identifies a very experienced amateur radio operator, often a former Marine radio operator.

[/quote]


73
de DD5RK
[SK]
EE






Posted: 2022-01-13 23:03
Interesting, but just because its in print doesn't make it so (as the internet and media companies demonstrate every day).

The HI could be plausible, but I go with a historical reference like Nonagenarian suggests.

Also you likely will not here many real commercial operators say they purposely miss-send code. The whole idea of a prosign is NO spacing (again was different because it was so special.) so stretching, adding spacing, or leaning on the final DAH like in CQ CQ C dah dah di daaaaaah is
creative nonsense.


Posted: 2022-01-14 00:20
Right
In American MRailway code, the O was two clearly separated dots.
They had also the in Gerke and international Morse code missing ampersand &
as what we now decode as es.


Posted: 2022-01-14 00:21
Or you could say it is putting personality into your sending. I do understand those saying that a bug CAN sound beatiful, and not by sending perfect and exact code like a paddle and keyer, but with a slight twist... But of course not exageraging to the point of illegible code... With the BUG or straightkey, you have the possibility of emphasising certain parts of your sending.
You know, like talking to people in real life, it's nice that we don't sound the same. I have danish friends that all send good code, but they do sound different, and I can tell who is who in a ring-QSO. That's nice.
And CB/Chris, using a little imagination, and thinking a little about it, doesn't h e-e h e-e sound just a tiny bit as laughter to you...? Well, to me it does :)


Posted: 2022-01-14 10:30
Sebastian:
Or you could say it is putting personality into your sending.


The senders unique "fist" was all personality, but you need a manual key for that https://www.skccgroup.com/ ,
https://www.google.com/search?q=morse+code+fist&ei=rz3hYYntMcW78gKTi56QAQ&ved=0ahUKEwjJgJC88rD1AhXFnVwKHZOFBxIQ4dUDCA4&uact=5&oq=morse+code+fist&gs_lcp=Cgdnd3Mtd2l6EAMyBAgAEAoyBwgAEIAEEAoyBAgAEAoyBQgAEIAEMgQIABAKMggIABAWEAoQHjoHCAAQRxCwAzoHCAAQsQMQQzoFCAAQkQI6BAgAEEM6CAgAELEDEJECOggIABCABBDJAzoGCAAQFhAeSgUIPBIBMUoECEEYAEoECEYYAFD2BliGFWD2HGgBcAJ4AIABZYgBmwWSAQM4LjGYAQCgAQHIAQjAAQE&sclient=gws-wiz
and so it died with electronic keyers, unless you get your spacings wrong the same way all the time . . .

The y-service used to photograph the undulator graph of enemy operators and analyse their profile, so individual operators could be traced and units followed about, even if the local Y-operator had never heard that enemy operator before . .


Sebastian:

I do understand those saying that a bug CAN sound beatiful,


If you like banana boat swingers ( or Lake Erie ) maybe . .

http://www.schulheft-ottakring.eu/vane/afu/cw/CW%20Literatur/Banana%20Boat%20Swing.pdf

Sebastian:

and not by sending perfect and exact code like a paddle and keyer, but with a slight twist... But of course not exageraging to the point of illegible code... With the BUG or straightkey, you have the possibility of emphasising certain parts of your sending.
You know, like talking to people in real life, it's nice that we don't sound the same. I have danish friends that all send good code, but they do sound different, and I can tell who is who in a ring-QSO. That's nice.
And CB/Chris, using a little imagination, and thinking a little about it, doesn't h e-e h e-e sound just a tiny bit as laughter to you...? Well, to me it does :)


Not really - but in the UK it would be t 5 t 5 for ha ha ha so nearly there I suppose . . .

cb


Posted: 2022-01-15 00:13
In the fifties of the previous century you had CCCP club stations, with tjirp and 50 Hz tone, plus click all over the band. I suppose those guys build their club transmitter as a one tuber, with some power tube, with raw DC on the anode.

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