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LCWO Discussion Forum [Atom LCWO Forum Feed]

This is a simple discussion forum for LCWO users. Feel free to use it for any kind of discussion related to this website.

Thread: The struggle to type

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AuthorText


Posted: 2021-07-01 18:32
Hi, I am struggling to type: 25wpm, lesson 12... it gets worse every day, I am quite sure I can recognize the different characters (so far), but when it comes to type, I am not able... at least I feel not to be able, no more... I usually start at 24wpm, then I move up to 26wpm in at least 150 exercises before going to next lesson...
Someone suggested me NOT to type and just let the mind decode... but this way I cannot measure my level of training (I gusess)... I think I'll have to do like that when I'll decode phrases, abbreviations and such things, but I am still at characters...
The question is: how do you type?
What can I do to improve? It's frustrating...
Thanks for reading, 73 - IV3YNB


Posted: 2021-07-01 22:04
iv3ynb:


SNIP

Someone suggested me NOT to type and just let the mind decode... but this way I cannot measure my level of training (I gusess)...

SNIP

Thanks for reading, 73 - IV3YNB


Hi

Really, you probably want to learn to decode in your head - so you neither HAVE to write down NOR carry a keyboard with you.

To do this you need to practice both decoding and remembering what the previous letters were at the same time.


Ideally you will learn an automatic response, so the letter pops into your mind at the sound of the morse, without you having to think about it at all.


Probably you are best avoid learning to type at the same time - else you may link morse->keyboard and need the keyboard all the time (YMMV of course).


For now, you could either write down the characters (if you can write that fast), and type then in afterwards - say every 5 or 10 sets to see how you are doing.

Probably you have a good idea of how many you are getting right.

Just don't move on until you are approaching an automatic response, else you will stall a few lessons along . .

cb






Posted: 2021-07-02 10:16
Thanks for the suggestions, in any case I think about this: the teaching method present in LCWO was been made to learn to receive CW at speed much higher than my current 25wpm... how is it possible that already at 25wpm I find difficulty in progressing and going beyond? Many say to me to force the speed beyond my current reception limit, and that's what I do. But increasing speed, I get difficultness to write or type. And it is really unthinkable for me NOT to write or type the characters: how can I measure my progress if I do NOT write them while I receive them?
Should I just "trust" me while receiving?
If so, I could say that "I have already learned the whole alphabet"...

I think I am already in stall, and I have to get out of it ;-)

73, de IV3YNB


Posted: 2021-07-02 10:51

Hi Matteo

Did you see in "Introduction"

"The default speed for new users is 20 WPM characters, 15 WPM effective . . " ?


How long have you taken to get to lesson 12 ? since you signed up in 2008, or did you actually just start ?



What overall speed are you learning at ? ( 25/25 or 25/10 etc )

How long does it take to get to 90% on a lesson.


If you can't type at the speed you are learning, then you either need to write down and type in afterwards or have groups of characters with gaps to allow you to catch up typing in the group . .

The "stall" is when you get up to a certain lesson and can't seem to proceed because you are still thinking to decode - instead of an automatic response with no thinking
- or -
you are mixing up the characters in some way eg. you pick up differences between di and da rather than dit and da, so dit-da-da-da mixes up with dah-dit-dit-dit i.e. different then three same



cb


Posted: 2021-07-02 11:45
Hi, here's my story:

In 2008 I knew about LCWO, I signed in but never used it seriously.
I had a STOP due to personal reasons in 2015, now I'll be back on the air in late summer.

I started LCWO seriuosly on 2021-04-15 from lesson 3

I already operated CW on air before 2015 but now I want to gain speed to stand contest speed, I am not into rag chew but I want to learn WELL the basics to get on air reliably.

I start my lessons at 24/25, then 25/25 and so on up to 26/26; I run at least 150 exercises per lesson. Sometinmes I get 90% very early (a couple of exercises), but I force to get 150 exercises as a baseline. I do CW practice with LCWO every day.

I actually still tend to decode dots and dashes... anyway I feel better hearing CW at higher speed than at lower speed. At 26wpm I tend NOT to count but only hear... however it seems I have too little time to type, then I make a mistake; if I relize it (!!!) then I am in stall for the next couple of groups...

Maybe I should set speed 26wpm with a wider space from group to group... anyway sooner or later I'll have to get code as on the air, sometimes contesters are very fast, and also rag chewers do... I cannot imagine how to reach speed, sometimes I feel I have to give up :-(

73, IV3YNB


Posted: 2021-07-02 16:47
I'm far from an expert at any of this, but I can type fairly fast - faster than I can receive code!

So, assuming that for your contesting you *NEED* to type the callsigns and other details into a logging program, would it be better to spend time on increasing your typing speed by itself (i.e. not when receiving code)?

If you want to be able to keep up with the code you are able to receive then you will probably need to learn how to touch-type (type without looking at the keys).

Equally, if you do all your logging on paper and can write suitably fast, just ditch the computer and write the code by hand and then type everything in at the end for verification.


Posted: 2021-07-02 22:09
iv3ynb:
Hi, here's my story:

In 2008 I knew about LCWO, I signed in but never used it seriously.
I had a STOP due to personal reasons in 2015, now I'll be back on the air in late summer.

I started LCWO seriuosly on 2021-04-15 from lesson 3

I already operated CW on air before 2015 but now I want to gain speed to stand contest speed, I am not into rag chew but I want to learn WELL the basics to get on air reliably.

I start my lessons at 24/25, then 25/25 and so on up to 26/26; I run at least 150 exercises per lesson. Sometinmes I get 90% very early (a couple of exercises), but I force to get 150 exercises as a baseline. I do CW practice with LCWO every day.

I actually still tend to decode dots and dashes... anyway I feel better hearing CW at higher speed than at lower speed. At 26wpm I tend NOT to count but only hear... however it seems I have too little time to type, then I make a mistake; if I relize it (!!!) then I am in stall for the next couple of groups...

Maybe I should set speed 26wpm with a wider space from group to group... anyway sooner or later I'll have to get code as on the air, sometimes contesters are very fast, and also rag chewers do... I cannot imagine how to reach speed, sometimes I feel I have to give up :-(

73, IV3YNB



Depending upon how much you actually already know, you are probably better getting through the 40 lessons and then worrying about speed.

People should slow down to your speed on the air, so you shouldn't be short of contacts.

cb






Posted: 2021-07-03 15:00
Yes, I'll go thru all 40 lessons... thank you all ;-)

73 de IV3YNB


Posted: 2021-07-03 17:53
I can type about 37 WPM and a little faster sometimes. However, I never combine typing and my CW practices. I think that is an obstacle that I would not want to introduce into my efforts. I do copy code with handwritten efforts. Writing is so much more convenient for me.


Posted: 2021-07-04 00:08
Bruce,

Wise decision, IMHO


Posted: 2021-07-06 14:47
BrucerDucer1:
...I think that is an obstacle that I would not want to introduce into my efforts. ...



Good, I tried and I am happy to be able to copy handwritten but I DO HAVE to intorduce 1 second more between groups to do like that...
The question is: the code on air hasn't got this EXTRA pause that I am introducing... am I still learning well the code?

73 de IV3YNB


Posted: 2021-07-06 16:20
"...am I still learning well the code?"---Matteo
Matteo, in the final analysis, the code that you can learn, is the code that will be learned well. Not every person has the ability to "learn well" if that involve a speed that is beyond a person's ability.
Another issue is whether or not an excess of high expecations and self-criticism is healthy? I think doubts can become obstacle if a person sets an unrealistic standard for accomplishment. Learning can be torture, just as easily as it can be fun. A person can enjoy learning, even if the speed is not the same for all persons. Remember the line from the "Dirty Harry" movies, where Clint Eastwood as "Dirty Harry" says: "A man's got to know his limitations." I have limitations. I work within them, but I still learn and I am happy with that.


Posted: 2021-07-06 19:36
iv3ynb:

Good, I tried and I am happy to be able to copy handwritten but I DO HAVE to intorduce 1 second more between groups to do like that...
The question is: the code on air hasn't got this EXTRA pause that I am introducing... am I still learning well the code?

73 de IV3YNB


You are really aiming to build an automatic response along the lines of:-

hear morse code -> characters pop into your head automatically with no thinking about it

This doesn't mean that they appear instantly - and you also need eventually to assemble them into meaning,
which involves decoding abbreviations, all in your head.

You learn by:- hear -> decode repeat,repeat,repeat until it happens automagically


If you don't allow time to decode whilst you are learning then you learn nothing.

If you allow too much time per character to decode then you have time to keep thinking,
so that MIGHT be what happens and you take longer to build the auto response.


If you run strings of characters and decode whilst you are also listening to the stings,
then have extra time just to finish writing what you ALREADY decoded then you are starting to head-copy.

You learn by listening to and understanding lots of morse.

cb







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