[LCWO LOGO]  

Login

User name:
Password:


Language
Български Português brasileiro
Bosanski Català
繁體中文 Česky
Dansk Deutsch
English Español
Suomi Français
Ελληνικά Hrvatski
Magyar Italiano
日本語 한국어
Bahasa Melayu Nederlands
Norsk Polski
Português Română
Русский සිංහල
Slovenščina Srpski
Svenska ภาษาไทย
Türkçe Українська
简体中文
Who is online? (21)


LCWO Discussion Forum [Atom LCWO Forum Feed]

This is a simple discussion forum for LCWO users. Feel free to use it for any kind of discussion related to this website.

Thread: To Farnsworth or not to Farnsworth? That is the question.

Back to the Forum

AuthorText


Posted: 2020-09-02 22:51
I've had an interesting experience. I am just learning CW. i had been using YouTube and have learned a few of the signs. Some of them are slowish but i thought that was the way to learn. Then i read about Farnsworth/Koch. Ok. Made sense. Got an app which i like, Morse trainer. Been listening with Farnsworth engaged. Then i decided to slow it down and turn off the Farnsworth setting. There result? I couldn't understand the characters! I was really surprised. So my take away is maybe you should listen at different does because you might need to understand someone's slow coding one day!


Posted: 2020-09-03 12:25

Some of the first part of learning to decode morse is to find out what your aptitude actually is . . .


Some people get to 25/25 in a week or two . . others may take 2 years to get to their personal maximum of 20/20


One important think to bear in mind is that if you go too fast,
you will appear to be making progress,
but that progress will stall after a few lessons
and you will find you haven't really leaned much at all
and have to start again.

Lots of people start again - for a number of reasons - but you really want to avoid this.

Most people faced with "start again" give up - at least for some time.




On the other hand - if you go too slow you only waste time . . .




The first component of learning to decode is to learn to recognise the characters.

Then building up ( by sufficient repetition ) to this becoming an automatic response
requiring no effort - as if the characters just appear in you head.


To avoid losing interest and giving up,
you probably want to be making steady, continuous and noticeable progress.




So you are best advised to learn at the fastest rate you can manage . . .
- but it's not always so easy to work out what that will be
- and we won't be much help if you don't know yourself.




The "key" thing on lcwo is to get through all 40 lessons making steady progress.


Then you can think about different speeds.


Of course, if you have high aptitude you will wizz through and won't need any advise at all . . .


good luck anyway

let us know how you get on . . .

cb













Posted: 2020-09-10 19:44
I found that I like to start a daily lcwo session with a very slow farnsworth warmup. I drop my effective speed to 12 , make a test, find myself not that bad, then raise the effective speed slowly up to 17 or 18, character speed doesnt move @ 19.

I found that if I don't do that, often I make several very bad tests at the beginning, which makes me grumpy, sets my mind to stressed, and the whole session is screwed.

If I start the day with easy farnsworth tests , I feel confident and relaxed, then I can build up the effective speed test after test, and finish the day with good results.

Just my experience, yours may totally differ...


Posted: 2020-09-11 07:36
Why not start with a lower speed for warm up, instead of slower Farnsworth?

73


Posted: 2020-09-11 10:27
test:
Why not start with a lower speed for warm up, instead of slower Farnsworth?

73



I think a better tip is to start off listening to faster code, which makes you normal speed seem quite a bit slower.

One characteristic of success at learning to decode is that the code seems to suddenly go slower - or that you suddenly seem to have more time somehow . . .


YMMV

cb


Posted: 2020-09-11 12:20
Well,

if learners only listen to Farnsworth at high speed - how will they learn lower speeds as often found on the bands?



Posted: 2020-09-11 12:35
test:
Well,

if learners only listen to Farnsworth at high speed - how will they learn lower speeds as often found on the bands?



I didn't advocate that, only suggested trying starting the session with a bit of higher speed;
although most people who can lean at a higher speed will probably wish to do so . . .

I expect they wouldn't bother ( in the happy high speed senario ) with the lower speeds . . .
. . else it's just more practice.








Posted: 2020-09-12 17:46
I think you're right. I've learned at 20/10wpm on lcwo, and I had to 'relearn' to listen to 10wpm without the extra spacing. It didn't take long to relearn, but it was unexpected. I also had to 'relearn' to listen to human morse on the radio, as opposed to perfect-timing morse on lcwo. If someone is sending straight-key morse with a bit of a swing to their timing, it takes me a while to get my brain tuned in - I heard someone the other night who sent "CQ CQ CQ" quite quickly, then their call sign much more slowly.


Posted: 2020-09-13 00:28
andrewbirkett:
I think you're right. I've learned at 20/10wpm on lcwo, and I had to 'relearn' to listen to 10wpm without the extra spacing. It didn't take long to relearn, but it was unexpected. I also had to 'relearn' to listen to human morse on the radio, as opposed to perfect-timing morse on lcwo. If someone is sending straight-key morse with a bit of a swing to their timing, it takes me a while to get my brain tuned in - I heard someone the other night who sent "CQ CQ CQ" quite quickly, then their call sign much more slowly.


Yup, call; qth; op name; etc.

It makes you wonder how fast people really are . . .

Back to the Forum

You must be logged in to post a message.