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LCWO Discussion Forum [Atom LCWO Forum Feed]

This is a simple discussion forum for LCWO users. Feel free to use it for any kind of discussion related to this website.

Thread: Why learn morse code?

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AuthorText


Posted: 2020-08-22 02:05
I'm a musician. For whatever reason, I downloaded a "learn morse code" app on tour once. It was a good way to kill time in the van. I recently picked it up again and found this site. I like it a lot more than the app.

Anyway, I'm just curious why y'all do it. I have no idea why I'm doing it. I suppose simply because I find it fun, in its way.


Posted: 2020-08-22 11:27
ialdabaoth:
I'm just curious why y'all do it. I have no idea why I'm doing it. I suppose simply because I find it fun, in its way.


Ham Radio
Boy Scouts
Dad knew it . .
Friends learning it . .
Read about it in a book
Heard it in a film/TV prog
Prepers
Heard it was a challenge
. . .


https://lcwo.net/forum/689


Posted: 2020-08-22 13:01
The question is entirely justified. The local amateur radio club I am in considers Morse code to be out of order and obsolete.
Morse code no longer has any commercial significance. It is a hobby.
Morse code is a skill similar to playing a musical instrument. You can't buy this skill; you have to work hard to get it. I am a radio amateur. I want to communicate with this operating mode. The advantage of Morse code is that you can use it to operate self-made transmitters. You can go very far with small power. I have already been received in the USA with 1W transmission power (I live in Germany).

Morse code is a world heritage.
https://www.unesco.de/en/morse-telegraphy


Posted: 2020-08-22 13:28
DD5RK:
The question is entirely justified. The local amateur radio club I am in considers Morse code to be out of order and obsolete.


No contesters ??

DD5RK:

Morse code no longer has any commercial significance. It is a hobby.
Morse code is a skill similar to playing a musical instrument. You can't buy this skill; you have to work hard to get it. I am a radio amateur. I want to communicate with this operating mode. The advantage of Morse code is that you can use it to operate self-made transmitters. You can go very far with small power. I have already been received in the USA with 1W transmission power (I live in Germany).

Morse code is a world heritage.
https://www.unesco.de/en/morse-telegraphy



Morse is still monitored by the military:-

https://www.goodfellow.af.mil/Newsroom/Article-Display/Article/2099702/316th-trs-hosts-inaugural-language-fair/

It is used in the far east quite a bit . . .

It would be useful in certain emergency situations if enough people learned it . .


Posted: 2020-08-22 15:55
I learn morse code because I always need to learn something challenging to feel good. Once I will know morse, I will get bored and then I think I'll try to learn Russian or / and Arabic.
Also, I am a ham operator, and I want to communicate with other ham fellows using it. The sounds of morse are part of the sounds of radio that fascinated me when I was a kid. Being able to get the meaning of the sounds, and to participate is something really appealing for me :-)


Posted: 2020-08-23 00:36
Thanks for your responses.


Posted: 2020-08-26 16:21
I'm a new ham operator but struggle to hear spoken words over noisy lines, so thought that maybe CW would be easier. Plus it's a challenge and I also like learning new things.


Posted: 2020-08-26 19:50
I have a license VA7MMP but I am both impoverished and able to build things. So I thought the easiest and cheapest way of getting on the air would be to learn code and then build the TX/RX to do it. The TX/RX is done, just need to learn the code. Which is the hardest bit!


Posted: 2020-08-26 21:43
Hi Sephen

VA7MMP:
I have a license VA7MMP but I am both impoverished and able to build things. So I thought the easiest and cheapest way of getting on the air would be to learn code and then build the TX/RX to do it.


yup


VA7MMP:

The TX/RX is done, just need to learn the code. Which is the hardest bit!



Keeping going, if your expectations were too high, would be a good candidate.


How much of the 15 months since you signed up have you spent practising ?

How much SWL are you doing ?

Any mp3s of morse on your cellphone ?

cb




Posted: 2020-08-26 22:24
Your are right----inconstant and generally lack of practice. I listen in on Morse News which seems like a better quality of sending than SWL. Thanks.


Posted: 2020-08-27 07:30
I was looking for some way to train my brain and this suited me. Then i got general license and did my first QSO. Still fascinated about this old technology :-) Without ham radio, i would still continue to learn CW because i really enjoy it.


Posted: 2020-08-27 14:02
As a child, I listened to an old tube receiver with long medium and short waves. I heard these bewitching sounds). It was a mystery. Later, I was always fond of communications and radio. But almost always I just listened.
Only three months ago I got my first license. It seems to me not very interesting to work with voice. I still hope to someday QSO by telegraph.
I also have some brain health damage . And it's also a brain training.


Posted: 2020-08-27 16:40
Why not?

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