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Thread: When to move on to the next lesson?

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AuthorText


Posted: 2015-01-15 07:53
Hello,
I'm able to do lesson 3 at 95% accuracy with 13 wmp. The instructions up front say to move on when you can hit 90% accuracy. Do they mean the very first time you hit 90%? I feel like I should be able to hit 90% consistently before moving on.

I'm interested in hearing the opinions out there.

Thanks,
Tom


Posted: 2015-01-15 17:45
To me it is only when I am relaxed with the present lesson that I move on. At first when introducing a new letter I find it messes up everything. Some more than others. I stay at it until I am comfortable again and I relax. At first this took about 1 week. At lesson 32 it takes longer for me. If I were to average it out I would say I get about 93% or better before I move on. Good luck to you. Just do not give up. The best advice any of us can give is just do not give up. There is no end of the road hear.

Lynn


Posted: 2015-01-16 01:30
Hello Tom:
I agree with Lynn; move on when you're ready. For a couple of lessons, i was able to skip ahead after two or three attempts. But at lesson 31, I decided to go back 4 lessons for some review, and I'm proceeding through them again. Hang in there, practice daily, and proceed at YOUR pace.

73,
Neil


Posted: 2015-01-16 19:12
I guess don't move on the first time your score passes 90%, but don't hold yourself back once you feel you're comfortably past 90%. Maybe in the morning you'll figure "Hey, it's time to add the next one." Be relaxed about it, but keep an eye on where the errors are. With the later lessons the new character comes by less often, and you could easily get 90% without getting the new character correct even once, and there's no point moving forward until you're getting the new character right...


Posted: 2015-01-29 08:18
Thanks everyone. I do wish the new letters would get emphasized a little more than the others. I also find I have to dial the speed back when adding a new letter and then increasing the speed as my score gets better. Am I asking for trouble doing this - meaning should I just gut it out at the higher speed until I finally get it?

I'm guessing that it gets easier to maintain speed when you are in the upper 20s as the new letter doesn't appear as often and you don't get messed up as often.


Posted: 2015-01-29 13:43
Maybe a strange question from my side, but how do you copy the signs?
Do you count the dits and dahs, or are you listening to the sound of each sign?
The earlier you teach yourself to recognize the sound of each sign, the faster you can speed up.
If you start counting the dits and dahs, you won't be able to recognize them anymore, once you want to speed up.


Posted: 2015-02-04 06:44
I'm going by the sound of them. I don't know how anyone could count. I'm getting better at distinguishing between S and U.

I'm also typing the letters in. I tried writing them down on paper, but I don't see how that is fundamentally different - both are almost involuntary muscle reactions to a sound. Plus I can't write at rates much higher than 8, while typing can keep up.

I'm dialing the speed back when introducing a new letter, and then staying with that set of letters while increasing speed.


Posted: 2015-02-04 16:26
It's better to listen and guess... Trouble is it can be too easy to count, even with characters sent at 30wpm or more, especially when it's time to learn numbers because numbers and counting are naturally linked.


Posted: 2015-02-05 02:15
I haven't tried numbers yet. I can see where that can get you into a bad habit


Posted: 2015-02-06 12:23
Hello all,

I can easily count dots and dashes at 50 wpm. So the argument to increase speed to prevent counting is not valid IMHO - even if it is often repeated in CW forums these days..

As for "listen and guess": bad approach IMO. I try to listen and understand. On bad days I simply decrease speed. On good days, I increase speed. But accuracy is what counts in communication (no matter if QSO or contest or ..), and accuracy is the opposite of guessing.

GL with CW

Gerd.


Posted: 2015-02-06 12:59
Hello Gerd,

If i go up in speed, i am no longer able to count the dits and dahs, but i rocognize the sound of the signs.
Maybe you have better ears HI.
I agree when you say that guessing is not the right way.
In stead of listen and guess, it's better to say listen and learn to recognize.
And once you start recognizing the signs, it is much more fun to learn.


Posted: 2015-02-06 18:08
I have been at this for a bit. I have tried counting. I have tried listening to the sound of each letter and number. I can only speak for myself but I must hear the sound and nothing else. When we speak to one another we all make sounds. This sound makes a word to us. I find I must do the same with the dit's
and da's. When counting, I must first count and then decide what it has made up. This takes time. In that time more letters have gone by.
I move on when I am relaxed with what is before me. I no longer feel rushed.

73
Lynn


Posted: 2015-02-07 00:25
In the end it will work Lynn, it will.
With a lot of patience, and practice practice practice.


Posted: 2015-02-10 19:35
I can count dots and dashes even for characters sent at over 30wpm. The counting habit is hard to break. You need to take the responsibility for recognition away from your conscious analytical dot-and-dash-counting brain. To do that you need to demand a rapid response, and the best way I can describe that process is "guessing". It's not a random guess, it's informed by your sub-conscious having heard the character. The point is that it has to happen rapidly, without you consciously thinking "What was that character?" and breaking it into dots and dashes. Once you know the character, you'll "guess" it correctly every time...

...or so the hypothesis suggests.

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